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dc.contributor.authorÖzyüksel, Arda
dc.contributor.authorÖlmüşçelik, Oktay
dc.contributor.authorKayan, Ekin
dc.contributor.authorAkçevin, Atıf
dc.date.accessioned10.07.201910:49:13
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-10T19:56:29Z
dc.date.available10.07.201910:49:13
dc.date.available2019-07-10T19:56:29Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationÖzyüksel, A., Ölmüşçelik, O., Kayan, E. ve Akçevin, A. (2013). EComment. Interpretation of the data together with the management of cardiac surgery patients with diabetes mellitus. Interactive Cardiovascular And Thoracic Surgery, 270(11), 2901-2907. https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/icvts/ivt470en_US
dc.identifier.issn1569-9293
dc.identifier.issn1569-9285
dc.identifier.urihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1093/icvts/ivt470
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12511/2720
dc.descriptionWOS: 000327456100026en_US
dc.descriptionPubMed ID: 24243950en_US
dc.description.abstractWe have read with interest the analysis by Tennyson et al. of the role of HbA1c in predicting the mortality and morbidity outcomes in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) [1]. In such patients, higher fasting blood glucose (FPG) levels are associated with a higher incidence of arrhythmia, atelectasis and prolonged mechanical ventilation, whereas higher HbA1c levels are associated with a higher incidence of intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, massive bleeding and multi-organ failure [2]. Although diabetes mellitus (DM) is traditionally known to be associated with an increased risk for CABG, there are also adverse outcomes reported in the literature indicating similar hospital mortality rates for diabetic and non-diabetic patient groups [3]. In fact, delaying the surgical procedure seems to be the safest measure when quadrupled mortality for CABG is noted with HbA1c values of over 8.6% [1]. Since the lifespan of red blood cells is around three months, any effective change in HbA1c levels will be assumed to take place within 10-12 weeks. So, the question is about which parameters we are able to manipulate in a patient with altered FBG levels who are candidates for a CABG procedure and how we can interpret and evaluate the HbA1c and FPG levels in these patients. In our clinical practice we put all DM patients who are on oral hypoglycaemic drugs onto dual insulin treatment in the preoperative period without taking HbA1c levels into account.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherOxford Univ Pressen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_US
dc.subjectECommenten_US
dc.subjectInterpretation of the Data Togetheren_US
dc.subjectManagement of Cardiacen_US
dc.subjectSurgery Patientsen_US
dc.subjectDiabetes Mellitusen_US
dc.titleEComment. Interpretation of the data together with the management of cardiac surgery patients with diabetes mellitusen_US
dc.typeletteren_US
dc.relation.journalInteractive Cardiovascular And Thoracic Surgeryen_US
dc.departmentİstanbul Medipol Üniversitesi, Tıp Fakültesi, Cerrahi Tıp Bilimleri Bölümü, Kalp ve Damar Cerrahisi Ana Bilim Dalıen_US
dc.departmentİstanbul Medipol Üniversitesi, Tıp Fakültesi, Cerrahi Tıp Bilimleri Bölümü, Çocuk Cerrahisi Ana Bilim Dalıen_US
dc.departmentİstanbul Medipol Üniversitesi, Tıp Fakültesi, Dahili Tıp Bilimleri Bölümü, İç Hastalıkları Ana Bilim Dalıen_US
dc.authorid0000-0002-9815-1848en_US
dc.authorid0000-0002-0799-4875en_US
dc.identifier.volume17en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.startpage1008en_US
dc.identifier.endpage1008en_US
dc.relation.publicationcategoryDiğeren_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/icvts/ivt470en_US


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