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dc.contributor.authorGönen, Mübeccel
dc.contributor.authorGüler Yıldız, Tülin
dc.contributor.authorÜlker-Erdem, Ayça
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, Aileen
dc.contributor.authorRaikes, Helen
dc.contributor.authorAcar, İbrahim Hakkı
dc.contributor.authorÖzkan-Yıldız, Feyza
dc.contributor.authorKarlıdağ, İpek
dc.contributor.authorUçuş, Şükran
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Dawn L.
dc.date.accessioned10.07.201910:49:13
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-10T19:49:44Z
dc.date.available10.07.201910:49:13
dc.date.available2019-07-10T19:49:44Z
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.citationGönen, M., Güler Yıldız, T., Ülker Erdem, A., Garcia, A., Raikes, H., Özkan Yıldız, F. … Davis, D. L. (2019). Examining the association between executive functions and developmental domains of low-income children in the United States and Turkey. Psychological Reports, 122(1), 155-179. https://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0033294118756334en_US
dc.identifier.issn0033-2941
dc.identifier.issn1558-691X
dc.identifier.urihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0033294118756334
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12511/1740
dc.descriptionWOS: 000456528000010en_US
dc.descriptionPubMed ID: 29436982en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the relations between executive functions and developmental domains of preschool children from low-income families through an intercultural perspective in the U.S. and Turkey. A total of 471 children and their primary caregivers participated in the Turkey part of the study, while 286 children and their parents engaged in U.S. sample. Regression analyses revealed that fine motor, problem solving, and executive functions of children between two contexts were significantly different from each other. In the U.S., executive functions predicted communication, problem solving, and fine motor development, whereas in the Turkish sample, executive functions did not predict domain scores. Child gender predicted four of five developmental outcomes in the U.S., whereas maternal education predicted two of five outcomes in Turkey. In addition, invariance testing demonstrated that predictors to outcomes were not significantly different between the two countries. Country differences from the first set of outcomes were explained in the context of the research sites, children's socialization, and cultural expectations surrounding child development. This study raises questions about relations between executive functions and developmental domains for future research.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipHacettepe University Scientific Research Unit in Ankara [SDS-2015-5455]en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: The Turkey part of this work was supported by Hacettepe University Scientific Research Unit in Ankara, under research grant number SDS-2015-5455. The research was conducted by the allowance of Altindag. District National Education Directorate.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherSAGE Publications Incen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/embargoedAccessen_US
dc.subjectExecutive Functionsen_US
dc.subjectPreschoolersen_US
dc.subjectChild Developmenten_US
dc.subjectLow Incomeen_US
dc.subjectCross-Cultural Researchen_US
dc.titleExamining the association between executive functions and developmental domains of low-income children in the United States and Turkeyen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.relation.journalPsychological Reportsen_US
dc.departmentİstanbul Medipol Üniversitesi, Eğitim Fakültesi, Temel Eğitimen_US
dc.authorid0000-0003-4007-5691en_US
dc.identifier.volume122en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.startpage155en_US
dc.identifier.endpage179en_US
dc.relation.publicationcategoryMakale - Uluslararası Hakemli Dergi - Kurum Öğretim Elemanıen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0033294118756334en_US


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